EPISODE #42 – UNF PRESIDENT DR. MOEZ LIMAYEM – KNOW THY PRESIDENT

How to Ruin Dinner
How to Ruin Dinner
EPISODE #42 – UNF PRESIDENT DR. MOEZ LIMAYEM – KNOW THY PRESIDENT
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How To Ruin Dinner: Conversations at the University

UNF President Moez Limayem

Know Thy President UNF: A Conversation with Moez Limayem

Inspired by his father’s dedication as an elementary school teacher and principal in rural Tunisia, Dr. Limayem explains how his family’s respect for education and educators emboldened him to embark on an educational journey that has spanned four continents. Like the man in a Johnny Cash’s song, he’s been everywhere, man, he’s been everywhere: Tunis, Quebec, Canada  – where he was named Best Teacher in Canada – Hong Kong, Minnesota, Arkansas, Tampa, and Jacksonville. Dr. Limayem’s international perspective could explain his expansive vision for UNF. He looks to establish fruitful partnerships with Jacksonville businesses and donors and explains how cities worldwide are enriched economically and culturally by vibrant universities.

Beyond generalities, we discuss the challenges facing universities and UNF: retention and graduation rates, diversity, and a commitment to intellectual integrity. President Limayem is keenly aware of UNF’s responsibility to students who are working full-time and first-generation college students who may need more detailed roadmaps to navigate higher education. Finally, we discuss his academic work in consumer habits and technology.

It was a distinct pleasure and honor to have this hour with Dr. Limayem; I hope you enjoy this introduction to Moez Limayem.

17 Replies to “EPISODE #42 – UNF PRESIDENT DR. MOEZ LIMAYEM – KNOW THY PRESIDENT

  1. I think it’s interesting how Dr. Limayem became inspired to be an educator due to his father being an elementary school teacher and principal. One thing that I relate with is that my family also places significance in education and has always motivated me to do better and challenge myself throughout my educational experience. I also think it’s amazing how Dr. Limayem has experience in Hong Kong, Canada, Tunis, Minnesota, and more. I believe that all these experiences he has had in education can be beneficial for UNF in terms of increasing and being more open to diversity. In addition, since he has interacted and observed various students, instructors, and teaching styles I think it could be helpful in improving quality of education at UNF. Another thing I agree with and found inspiring is what Dr. Limayem says about giving students chances and even those that other universities would say no to. I also think that he makes a great point when discussing what makes us happy as I agree that a lot of people don’t take the time to do soul searching which I believe is important to do so in our lives.

  2. Thank you for sharing this information with us, Dr. Treyz and Dr. Limayem. As a UNF student, it has been a challenge to connect with my colleagues, especially those in leadership, because the campus is so crowded. Getting to know a little more about our president and his goals makes me feel already so much more comfortable with this school. Thank you for sharing a bit about your personal experiences and giving some helpful tips that I can use in my remaining years of education. It will very much be used!

  3. I enjoyed your discussion on how writing is a skill. I agree that it can be unrealistic to expect new students to be writing at a college level. It is the responsibility of the students to learn how to write better throughout their education.

  4. Dr. Limayen explains hsi life story before he became president of UNF. He became inspired by his father’s dedication as an elementary school teacher and principal in rural Tunisa. He has been to Canada, Hong Kong, Quebec, Canada, Minnesota, Arkansas, and Tampa. He wanted to establish fruitful partnerships with Jacksonville business and donors and he was explaining how cities around the world wee enriched economically and culturally by vibrant universities. Limayen says that he was aware of UNF’s responsibility to students working full time and first generation colleges students who might need more detailed roadmaps to navigate higher education. Finally, his academic work in consumer habits and technology were discussed as the last topic.
    I enjoyed listening to your video Dr. Limayen. I thought your backstory life was interesting and the things that people go through at UNF and other universities.

  5. I thought this podcast was very informative and actually interesting to listen to because I am a student at UNF. I really appreciate the president more now after listening to his background stories about moving around constantly and living in poor areas around the world. Dr. Limayen also seemed very appreciative and understanding about students that might not be familiar with taking the college route after high school.

  6. This story behind Dr. Limayen is very inspiring and is great motivation. One of the biggest things that inspired me is his work ethic and the work ethic of his father.

  7. This story is very inspiring. The work ethic of both President Limayen and his father is incredible and encourages my to do better.

  8. I find this interview interesting and on-point with addressing current issues that we face. The section where Ms. Treyz and the president discuss how we lose our self-awareness in face of disagreement, I thought to be especially relevant. I think it’s easier now, more than ever before, to disconnect with those around us. This disconnection is instrumental in the divide that was discussed. I too hope for this to be a place where people feel free to disagree and exchange ideas, and create study groups. For this to exist, in my opinion, there has to be an overall willingness and prioritization in connecting with others who may or may not disagree with you, and listening to them. If more connection is formed amongst us, addressing other matters, such as disproportional graduation rates, will be much smoother.

  9. Dr. Limayen explains his upbringing and life story before he ended up here at UNF as the President. He shared some interesting stories in the podcast like his father’s great dedication to education and learning. He is a strong believer in giving a chance to people with a lower social economic status and minorities at UNF. He wants to teach students how to think instead of what to think. I enjoyed your message and hearing what you have to offer to our school!

  10. This President of UNF Dr. Limayen shares his upbringing and life story before he ended up here at UNF. He shared some interesting stories in the podcast like his father’s great dedication to education and learning. He is a strong believer in giving a chance to people with a lower social economic status and minorities at UNF. He wants to teach students how to think instead of what to think. I enjoyed your message and hearing what you have to offer to our school!

  11. This President of UNF shares his upbringing and life story before he ended up here at UNF. He shared some interesting stories in the podcast like his father’s great dedication to education and learning. He is a strong believer in giving a chance to people with a lower social economic status and minorities at UNF. He wants to teach students how to think instead of what to think. I enjoyed your message and hearing what you have to offer to our school!

  12. I really enjoyed listening to this conversation. It’s amazing that Dr. Limayem has experienced living in 4 different continents. I strongly agree with his idea that telling students to change their majors because they are not doing good in one class is discouraging. We are here to learn, not to give up.

  13. I thought that this was a great podcast and I really enjoyed hearing more about Dr. Limayen. I enjoyed listening to his stories and learning things that I didn’t know about him.

  14. The way Dr. Limayen describes relying on self, peer/colleague, and mentor evaluations resonates with me as a means of growing self-knowledge through community. In discussing the community of a university (i.e., the culture at UNF) and how that university relates to the broader community (i.e., UNF’s relationships across the region), I was reminded of my introduction to the university and of a conversation with a friend studying in Tallahassee. I’m a Comparative Politics and International Relations concentrator now, and participated in Douglas Anderson’s Great Decisions Club in high school, which was facilitated by Dr. Gellers and Mrs. Gentry. This connected me to UNF and to the department I’d eventually enter into. Recently, I talked with a friend who now attends FSU about differences I’ve noticed between our discussion-based classes at DA and my discussion-based classes at UNF. I agree with the assessment that study groups and similar peer arrangements aren’t as central to UNF’s culture as they appear to be for other schools, in part because so many students work full-time, study full-time, and commute. This makes building those networks with peers and mentors less attainable (or, more directly, less affordable). Strengthening social support and the availability of scholarships are both strong positive steps that I’m glad to know the university is pursuing.

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